Farm Service Agency NAP Coverage Available for 2014 Annual Forage Crops-FSA UPDATE

Posted July 12, 2013 at 1:25 pm

Hand/Hyde County USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director Mary Johnson announced that FSA will offer Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage for 2014 crops that are planted annually and used for livestock feed or fodder.

The Risk Management Agency (RMA) recently announced a pilot program that offers a CAT level Rainfall Index-Annual Forage Insurance Plan to producers in Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma and South Dakota.

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FSAUPDATE

Because there is limited time for producers in these states to transition from NAP to the new RMA pilot program, an exception was made that will allow the states to continue offering NAP coverage for 2014 only. However, NAP coverage will not be available for 2015 annual forage crops in these specific states.

Eligible producers can apply for 2014 NAP coverage at the local County FSA Office using form CCC-471, Application for Coverage. To obtain 2014 NAP coverage for these crops, producers in South Dakota must file the application and pay the service fee by the following dates:

• September 30, 2013 for fall-seeded crops such as winter wheat and rye;

• March 15, 2014 for all other spring seeded forage crops.

The service fee is the lesser of $250 per crop or $750 per producer per administrative county, not to exceed a total of $1,875 for a producer with farming interests in multiple counties.

Producers who meet the definition of a limited resource farmer or rancher can request a waiver of the service fee.

NAP provides financial assistance to producers of noninsurable crops when low yields, loss of inventory or prevented planting occur due to normal disasters.

“The easiest way for producers to protect their investment is to purchase an insurance policy,” said CED Johnson.

“The past few years have proven that natural disasters are unavoidable, and producers can recover if they take the necessary precautions to mitigate risks.”

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